She with her hands the black-smiths body bound, And with her Iu'ry armes she twyn'd him round, And still the faire Queene with a prety grace, Disperst her sweet breath o're his swarty face: Her snowy armes so well she did display, That Vulcan thought they melted as they lay. Yet he forgot not that he woo'd the lasse, But made her twise as beauteous as she was, Because his wonted loue he needs would shew. And while the blacke night with her pitchie hand, Tooke iust possession of the swarfie land: He spent the darkesome howres in this delight, Giuing his power vp to the gladsome night: For ne're before he was so truely blest, To take an houre or one poore minutes rest. For sure they doe aspire: Else could a youth, Whose count'nance is so full of spotlesse truth, Be so relentlesse to a virgins tongue? And now she fastens on him as he swims, And holds him close, and wraps about his limbs. Her skinne was with a thinne vaile ouerthrowne, Through which her naked beauty clearly shone. Clad in these powerfull ornaments he flies, With out-stretcht wings vp to the azure skies: Where seeing Phoebus in his orient shrine, He did so well reuenge the god of wine, That whil'st the Sun wonders his Chariot reeles, The craftie god had stole away his wheeles. At last she tooke her hand from off that part, And sayd, It panted like anothers heart. MY wanton lines doe treate of amorous loue, Such as would bow the hearts of gods aboue: Then Venus, thou great Citherean Queene, That hourely tript on the Idalian greene, Thou laughing Erycina, daygne to see The verses wholly consecrate to thee; Temper them so within thy Paphian shrine, That euery Louers eye may melt a line; Commaund the god of Loue that little King, To giue each verse a sleight touch with his wing, That as I write, one line may draw the tother, And euery word skip nimbly o're another. For this olde grudge, he was the easlyer wonne To helpe young Bacchus 'gainst the fierie Sunne. Now was the Sunne inuiron'd with the Sea, Cooling his watrie tresses as he lay, And in dread Neptunes kingdome while he sleeps, Faire Thætis clips him in the watry deeps, The Mayre-maids and the Tritons of the West, Strayning their voyces, to make Titan rest. (Iust times decline, and all good dayes are dead, When heauenly othes had need be warranted) This heard great Iupiter and lik'd it well, And hastily he seeks Astræas cell, About the massie earth searching her towre: But she had long since left this earthly bowre, And flew to heauen aboue, lothing to see The sinfull actions of humanitie. Therefore Ioue meant to rise but with the sunne, Yet thought it long vntill the night was done. His parents hark'ned to his last request, And with that great power they the fountaine blest. The boy knew nought of love, and, touched with shame, He strove, and blushed, but still the blush became; In rising blushes still fresh beauties rose; The sunny side of fruit such blushes shows, And such the moon, when all her silver white Turns in eclipses to a ruddy light. Nor man nor mayd now could they be esteem'd: Neither, and either, might they well be deem'd, When the young boy Hermaphroditus sayd, VVith the set voyce of neither man nor mayd, Swift Mercury, the author of my life, And thou my mother Vulcans louely wife, Let your poore offsprings latest breath be blest, In but obtayning this his last request, Grant that whoe're heated by Phoebus beames, Shall come to coole him in these siluer streames, May neuermore a manly shape retaine, But halfe a virgine may returne againe. At her loose speach Hermaphroditus blusht: He knew not what loue was, yet loue did shame him, Making him blush, and yet his blush became him: Then might a man his shamefast colour see, Like the ripe apple on the sunny tree, Or Iuory dide o're with a pleasing red, Or like the pale Moone being shadowed. Therefore at his request she did obtaine The burning wheeles, that he had lost, againe: VVhich when he had receiu'd, he left the land, And brought them thither where his Coach did stand, And there he set them on: for all this space, The horses had not stirr'd from out their place. team: Help with the University’s computing systems: Help with accessing the online library, referencing and using libraries near you: Classical Receptions in Drama and Poetry in English from c.1970, OpenLearn: free Hear your Hermaphrodite, and grant my prayer; Oh, grant that--whom so'er these streams contain, If man he entered, he may rise again Supple, unsinewed, and but half a man! Then she began to chide her wanton eye, And fayne would shoot, but durst not see him die, She turnd and shot, and did of purpose misse him, Shee turnd againe, and did of purpose kisse him. Poem Title Original Publication CP Page no Salmacis and Hermaphroditus Tales From Ovid, London: Faber & Faber, 1997 1021-1024 Ages are bad, when men become so slow, That poore vnskillful mayds are forc't to woo. The more he spoke, the more did Vulcan sweare. This poem has not been translated into any other language yet. She vs'd in this light rayment as she was, To spread her body on the dewy grasse: Sometimes by her owne fountaine as she walkes, She nips the flowres from off the fertile stalkes, And with a garland of the sweating vine, Sometimes she doth her beauteous front in-twine: But she was gathering flowres with her white hand, When she beheld Hermaphroditus stand By her cleare fountaine, wondring at the sight, That there was any brooke could be so bright: For this was the bright riuer where the boy Did dye himselfe, that he could not enioy Himselfe in pleasure, nor could taste the blisses Of his owne melting and delicious kisses. 'Bright youth,' she cries, 'whom all thy features prove A God, and, if a God, the God of Love; But if a mortal, blest thy nurse's breast, Blest are thy parents, and thy sisters blest: But, oh! and support, Student Telling Astræa, It might now befall, That she might make him blest, that blesseth all: For as he walk'd vpon the flowry earth, To which his owne hands whilome gaue a birth, To see how streight he held it and how iust He rold this massy pondrous heape of dust, He laid him downe by a coole riuer side, Whose pleasant water did so gently slide With such soft whispering: for the brook was deepe, That it had lul'd him in a heauenly sleepe. The Nymph was taken with his golden hooke: Yet she turn'd backe, and would haue tript away; But Bacchus forc't the louely mayd to stay, Asking her why she struggled to be gone, Why such a Nymph should wish to be alone? But afterwards hee saw with better sight, He should be scorn'd by euery mortall wight, If he should want his thunderbolts, to beate Aspiring mortals from his glittering seate: Therefore the god no more did woo or proue her, But left to seeke her loue, though not to loue her. © Poems are the property of their respective owners. By this, the Nymph recouer'd had her tongue, That to her thinking lay in silence long, And sayd, Thy cheeke is milde, O be thou so, Thy cheeke, saith I, then do not answere no, Thy cheeke doth shame, then doe thou shame, she sayd, It is a mans shame to deny a mayd. All information has been reproduced here for educational and informational purposes to benefit site visitors, and is provided at no charge... Recite this poem (upload your own video or voice file). VVhich when he saw, he wept and 'gan to say, VVould Mercury had stole my wheeles away, When Phaeton my hare-brain'd issue tride, What a laborious thing it vvas to guide My burning chariot, the[n] he might haue pleas'd me, And of one fathers griefe he might haue eas'd me: For then the Steeds would haue obayd his will, Or else at least they would haue rested still. And euer since was womans loue so blest, That it will draw bloud from the strongerst brest. But when that beauteous face Diana saw, Her armes were nummed, & shee could not draw; Yet she did striue to shoot, but all in vaine, Shee bent her bow, and loos'd it streight againe. When first this wel-shapt boy, beauties chiefe king, Had seene the labour of the fifteenth spring, How curiously it paynted all the earth, He 'gan to trauaile from his place of birth, Leauing the stately hils where he was nurst, And where the Nymphs had brought him vp at first: He lou'd to trauaile to the coasts vnknowne, To see the regions farre beyond his owne, Seeking cleare watry springs to bathe him in: (For he did loue to wash his iuory skinne) The louely Nymphes haue oft times seene him swimme, And closely stole his clothes from off the brim, Because the wanton wenches would so fayne See him come nak'd to ask his clothes againe. The stream produced, nor slimy ooze, nor weeds, Nor miry rushes nor the spiky reeds: But dealt encircling moisture all around, The fruitful banks with cheerful verdure crowned, And kept the spring eternal on the ground A nymph presides, nor practised in the chase, Nor skilful at the bow, nor at the race; Of all the blue-eyed daughters of the main. The Nymph was pleas'd with this, Hoping to reape some vnaccustom'd blisse By the sweet pleasure that she should enioy, In the blest sight of such a melting boy. The Naiads nurst an infant heretofore, That Cytherea once to Hermes bore; From both the illustrious authors of his race The child was named; nor was it hard to trace Both the bright parents through the infant's face; When fifteen years, in Ida's cool retreat, The boy had told, he left his native seat, And sought fresh fountains in a foreign soil; The pleasure lessened the attending toil. 'Fair stranger then,' says she; 'it shall be so'; And, for she feared his threats, she feigned to go; But hid within a covert's neighboring green, She kept him still in sight, herself unseen. Here blusht the maid, And faine she would haue gone, but yet she staid. I would to God, he were the rosiat morne, And I a flowre from out the earth new-borne? 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