Each daughter's name reflects poetic terms for waves. London, England: Penguin Books Ltd. ISBN-13 978-0-140-44755-2, Anthony Faulkes (1995) Snorri Sturluson, Edda. During the party, Loki kills one of Ægir’s servants Fimafeng. In fact, in some ways ...". [12], There was a figure called Ægir or Hlér; he lived on an island, which is now called Hléysey. But as he is well-known for his wonderful parties, it could just be his way of avoiding gate-crashers. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. For other uses, see, Sacred trees and groves in Germanic paganism and mythology, Mythological Norse people, items and places, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ægir&oldid=975102964, Short description is different from Wikidata, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 26 August 2020, at 19:13. In Norse mythology, the goddess Rán and the jötunn Ægir both personify the sea, and together they have nine daughters who personify waves. He might be using his magic (Old Norse: seiðr), as his secret ingredient when he is brewing the beer in his huge cauldron. Jesse Byock (2005) Snorri Sturluson, The Prose Edda. Odin does not come to the feasts for the beer, he only likes wine, but he probably comes to learn some of Aegir’s magic. "I would like to add that there is a theory that associating the ...", "Loki admitted to being there and helping the gods kill Thjassi her father. [1], The Old Norse name Ægir ('sea') could stem from Proto-Germanic *āgwi-jaz ('that of the river/water'),[2] itself a derivative of Proto-Germanic *ahwō- ('river'; compare with Goth. The latter was killed by the treacherous god Loki during a banquet the gods held at Aegir’s undersea hall near the island of Hler (or Hlesey). An introduction describes Aegir as synony… Portrayed as a jötunn (giant), Ægir is also a frequent host of the Æsir (gods). [15], "Aegir" redirects here. Thor – God of thunderbolts, the oldest son of Odin, and one of the strongest gods of Norse mythology. edition. [9], The name 'Ægir' is identical to a noun for 'sea' in skaldic poetry, itself a base word in many kennings. ISBN 978-0-292-76499-6. Even Though Aegir is a jötunn (giant) the couple has befriended the Aesir, they are actually very well-liked among them, and they are often invited to the feasts in Asgard. They are sometimes referred to as the spirits of the waves or the nine billow maidens. Required fields are marked *. Thor and Tyrset out to recover a massive cauldron Tyr's father, the giant Hymir. This is the same fishing net as the trickster Loki once borrowed because he wanted to capture the dwarf Andvari who had turned himself into a pike (a fish). [14], In what appears to be a Norwegian genealogical tradition, Ægir is regarded as one of the three elements among the sea, the fire and the wind. They hoped that these treasures would please her and that she would grant them safe passage at sea. Sacrifices were made to appease him, particularly prisoners before setting sail. [7], In Skáldskaparmál (56), Snorri also depicts Ægir as a guest of the Æsir. As with all Sea Gods, he is worshiped and feared by sailors. In Gods and Creatures by SkjaldenAugust 4, 2020. [1] In Grímnismál, Ægir’s prowess as a host is the final motif Odin reveals to the King Geirröd. In the Poetic Edda, a collection of old Norse poetry, Aegir's habit of throwing feasts for the gods is established. Sacrifices were made to appease him, particularly prisoners before setting sail. 15th. Ran is a sea goddess, and her husband Aegir is a jotünn, and together they have nine daughters who all are named after the waves of the sea. Aegir – Norse God of the sea. [12][1] In Hymiskviða, Thor acquires a huge cauldron in which to brew beer as the gods expect to visit Ægir. He set off to visit Ásgard, and when the Æsir realized he was coming, he was given a splen did welcome, although many things were not as they seemed;[12], In Skáldskaparmál, the goddess Rán is portrayed as the wife of Ægir, and from their relationship were born Nine Daughters associated with the waves. [3] Richard Cleasby and Guðbrandur Vigfússon saw his name as deriving from an ancient Indo-European root. Aegir also spelled Ægir which means “sea” in Old Norse, is not a sea god, but he is a jötunn. There have been found some examples of these offerings at Tissø in Denmark, for instance, weapons and jewelry. In Lokasenna (Loki's Flyting), Loki's verbal duel with the gods occurs at a feast hosted by Ægir, and the poem is also called Ægisdrekka (Ægir’s Drinking Party) by paper manuscripts. He … edition. Aegir accepts, but sends Thor to find a cauldron large enough to brew beer in. Married to Ran and lives under the waves near the island of Hlesey. Ægir (anglicised as Aegir; Old Norse: "sea") is a divine personification of the sea in Norse mythology. Ger-Manni-appi, Ger-mannapii of “The-Oddini (tribe) of Odin and the Land or “Garden of Oddin/Adam/Atum/Aten” As-ia, Your email address will not be published. Texas, USA: University Research Institute of the University of Texas. For instance, in Hymiskviða, where Thor acquired a kettle large enough for Ægir to brew the ale for the Æsir, or in the poem Lokasenna, which is also known as Ægisdrekka ("Ægir's drinking party"). Aegir is the god of the sea in Norse mythology. Still, some of the most general characteristics attributed to Aegir and Ran by the pre-Christian Norse can be discerned. He was both worshipped and feared by sailors, for they believed that Aegir would occasionally appear on the surface to take ships, men and cargo alike, with him to his hall at the bottom of the ocean. In the Poetic Edda, Ægir has a wife, Rán, with whom he has begotten Nine Daughters associated with the waves, and his servants are named Fimafeng and Eldir. Ægir is the host of various feasts, several of which form the backdrop of other tales involving the gods. His two faithful servants are Eldir and Fimafeng. Thor pressures him to provide feasts for the gods. The Norse gods never decline an invitation, they love to come and visit and drink the beer that Aegir brews. Lokasenna ...", "Well, you see, Skadi was in love with Baldur, and never forgave Loki ...", "if magni is son of thor, then who is magni's son or children? In the Viking age, sailors would sometimes pay tribute to Ran before they would embark on their journeys to raid or trade. For instance, a ship is described as "Ægir's horse" and the waves as the "daughters of Ægir". Portrayed as a jötunn (giant), Ægir is also a frequent host of the Æsir (gods). Ægir – Norse god of the seas, equivalent to Poseidon. His wife is the sea goddess Ran with whom he has nine daughters (the billow maidens), who wore white robes and veils. London, England: Everyman J. M. Dent. In Norse mythology, Aegir and Ran are a married couple that lives under the sea. [3], Poetic kennings in both Hversu Noregr byggðist (How Norway Was Settled) and Skáldskaparmál (The Language of Poetry) treat Ægir and the sea-giant Hlér, who lives on the Hlésey ('Hlér island', modern Læsø), as the same figure. It always pays to respect watery Gods, especially Aegir as he has a fondness for dragging ships and men down to his halls. Even Though Aegir is a jötunn (giant) the couple has befriended the Aesir, they are actually very well-liked among them, and they are often invited to the feasts in Asgard. The latter tells him many stories of events in which the Æsir have participated, then Ægir questions Bragi about the origin of the mead of poetry. Balder – Son of Odin and Frigg. In Hymiskvitha, Aegir is described as "a giant from the stones". Aegir and Ran are often the hosts of the feasts themselves, and they send out invitations to the Aesir to visit them in their great hall in their underwater realm. His immense knowledge in the art of magic is known among the Aesir, probably one of the reasons why Odin wants to be around him. [14] Lindow notes however that since his wife Rán is listed among the ásynja (goddesses) in the same part of the Prose Edda, and since he had a close and friendly relationship with the Æsir (gods), Ægir's description as a jötunn appears questionable. [8] Rudolf Simek argues that it may be an erroneous interpretation of kennings in which different giant-names are used interchangeably. ISBN-13 978-0-4608-7616-2, Lee M. Hollander (1962) The Poetic Edda. Their names are bloody-hair (Blóðughadda), wave (Bylgja), foaming sea (Dröfn), pitching wave (Dúfa), the lifting one (Hefring), transparent wave (Himinglæva), welling wave (Hronn), cold wave (Kolga), frothing wave (Uðr). edition. Aegir was known for the lavish entertainment he gave to the other gods. According to Orchard, this could be a deliberate inversion of the traditional motif of Ægir as a host. alva 'body of water, river', OE ēa 'stream', OHG aha 'river'). [1], In several mnemonic þulur name-lists, Ægir is attached to the jötnar (giants). 1st. In the Poetic Edda, Ægir has a wife, Rán, with whom he has begotten Nine Daughters associated with the waves, and his servants are named Fimafeng and Eldir. Your email address will not be published. [1] Orchard argues on the contrary that Ægir's inclusion among the Æsir is probably a late development since his daughters are described as jötnar and some sources mention him as the descendant of the jötunn Fornjót. For you see, Aegir is very well-known for his astonishing beer throughout the nine realms. Aesir – A group of warrior gods led by Odin who inhabit Asgard. Ægir (anglicised as Aegir; Old Norse: "sea") is a divine personification of the sea in Norse mythology. Aegir is Agathi (tribe) AGothi and God-oddin of the sea’s. [10] In the dialogue, Ægir asks why the gold is called 'fire of the sea' or 'fire of Ægir', then Bragi answers that Gold was used to light Ægir’s hall when he entertained the Æsir. He was very crafty in magic. Aegir appears in Norse myth. Aegir also spelled Ægir which means “sea” in Old Norse, is not a sea god, but he is a jötunn. Ran (Old Norse: Rán), whose name means robbery, loves to spend her day catching and dragging drowning sailors with her huge fishing net down into her realm on the bottom of the sea. Unfortunately, as fragmentary as the sources for our knowledge of Norse mythology are, that doesnt come out to a particularly large number of mentions. However, we can never be certain that they were sacrifices to Ran, but it is a possibility. 3rd. [11], The short conversation has been regarded as a framed master-disciple dialogue in which Bragri's voice is that of Snorri himself discussing skaldic poetry. The beginning of the Orkneyinga saga (Saga of the Orkney Islanders) and Hversu Noregr byggdisk (How Norway Was Settled) tell that the giant king Fornjót had three sons: Hlér ('sea'), whom he called Ægir, a second named Logi ('fire'), and a third called Kári ('wind'). [7], Ægir is often portrayed in the eddic poems as the host of the gods. [5][6][7], Both the prose introduction to Lokasenna (Loki's Flyting) and Skáldskaparmál state that Ægir is also known as Gymir, the father of the jötunn (giantess) Gerðr. He was both worshipped and feared by sailors, for they believed that Aegir would occasionally appear on the surface to take ships, men and cargo alike, with him to his hall at the bottom of the ocean. He was associated with the law and control of Asgard, being the guardian of Norse gods. Learn how your comment data is processed. [1], In his treatise of poetry Skáldskaparmál, Snorri Sturluson portrays Ægir as sitting in Ásgard next to the Norse god of poetry Bragi. Aegir (pronounced EYE-gir; Old Norse Ægir) and Ran (pronounced RAN; Old Norse Rán) are two of the most often-mentioned giants in Norse mythology. [4] Guus Kroonen argues that the Germanic root *ahwō- is probably of Proto-Indo-European (PIE) origin, as it may be cognate with Latin aqua (via the common form *h₂ekʷ-eh₂-), and ultimately descend from the PIE root *h₂ep- ('water'; compare with Sanskrit áp- 'water' or Tocharian āp- 'water, river'). Motif of Ægir '' Aegir 's feasts married to Ran and lives under the waves or the billow! Texas, USA: University Research Institute of the sea to his halls and the waves or the realms! On an island, which is now called Hléysey Aegir and Ran are a married that. 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